Solved – Unable to remove OneDrive for Business from Windows 7

Solved – Unable to remove OneDrive for Business from Windows 7 – two versions of OneDrive on the same Windows 7 / Windows 10 PC. Remove / uninstall old version of OneDrive for Business. 

This may not be the most elegant/logical way of stopping the old/bad OneDrive from running, so let me know in the comments if you found the correct “Microsoft way” of fixing this issue. Others have spent hours trying to resolve this issue and hopefully you’ll get some kind of resolution with this information.

In some instances OneDrive for Business will ask you to upgrade. When you Update or upgrade OneDrive for Business it could keep the old version of OneDrive for Business on your computer, making it so that you have two versions of OneDrive for Business (even the icons look slightly different.) This may come pre-packaged with a Click to Run (clicktorun) install of Office or pre-installed on your system. You probably want to remove the older version of OneDrive for Business, but even after trying to uninstall OneDrive for Business old version from Programs and Features in the Control panel, even after restarting, the program comes back and you can’t delete it!

You probably still want to use OneDrive for Business, but you should only use the updated version that works correctly with Office365 and SharePoint Online.

Anyway, once your updated/upgraded OneDrive for Business is updated and installed, make sure you have all your important files inside the new OneDrive for Business and that the files are synced with SharePoint or where ever they should be. Make sure you have backups of the important files somewhere else like an external drive as well just to be safe. Once we disable the old OneDrive for Business / Groove.exe, make sure those old files are already synced with the new OneDrive for Business service. Once you have your files all synced and what-not with the new OneDrive for Business, we can disable/remove the old/bad version of OneDrive.

The older version of OneDrive for Business actually runs as Groove.exe. While the Task Manager is open (tick the check-mark or hit the button that says ‘Show Processes from All Users), track down Groove.exe by right-clicking on the bad OneDrive in the systray and then in the OneDrive menu, choose Exit (down by the clock – there may be two cloud icons down there, be sure to exit the correct one.) Then launch the old/bad OneDrive again from the Start > Program Files > OneDrive for Business. Do this several times and you will see Groove.exe pop in and out of existence inside the Task Manager. While it’s up and running, right click on the groove.exe in the task manager and choose “Open File Location”. The file will probably live somewhere similar to the following location:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office 15\root\office15\Groove.exe

Be sure to End Task or Exit out of the bad OneDrive for Business or Groove.exe, then rename the Groove.exe file to Groove.exe.old .

Now that this has been done, you may want to remove the old/bad OneDrive for Business link in your Explorer Favorites list. Do this with a left-click on the top-most Favorites link and in the right-hand pane, right-click on the old/bad OneDrive for Business shortcut and click Remove. Additionally you may want to remove the old/bad program shortcut in your Start Menu.

How to format a large external usb hard drive for use between both an OS X Mac and a Windows 10 PC

All versions of Windows since Windows Vista should be able to access a GUID drive. Because OS X is able to partition a GUID partition, we want to partition our large external hard drives with this compatible partition table. So, any modern computer since 2006 should be compatible. GUID doesn’t suffer from the restriction of a maximum partition size of 2TB, so if we have a hard drive larger than 2TB, we won’t be required to build multiple partitions with MBR.

Here’s a good quote for other important features regarding GUID (GPT stands for GUID Partition Table).

“On an MBR disk, the partitioning and boot data is stored in one place. If this data is overwritten or corrupted, you’re in trouble. In contrast, GPT stores multiple copies of this data across the disk, so it’s much more robust and can recover if the data is corrupted. GPT also stores cyclic redundancy check (CRC) values to check that its data is intact — if the data is corrupted, GPT can notice the problem and attempt to recover the damaged data from another location on the disk. MBR had no way of knowing if its data was corrupted — you’d only see there was a problem when the boot process failed or your drive’s partitions vanished.”

exFAT was released in 2006 as well, but Microsoft added backwards-compatibility to previous Windows versions from before Vista. The main benefit to it is that it doesn’t have the file size restrictions of FAT32, so individual files with exFAT can be larger than 4GB each. It probably isn’t super important for smaller files, but it could be a necessity for people working on larger files like videos or disk images.

Below is a step-by-step procedure for formatting a large External USB drive which can be used by both a Mac and a PC. This setup will utilize the newest, most fault-tolerant partition tables, and allows for the largest volume and file size capabilities. In my case I am formatting an 8TB Seagate Backup Plus+ USB 3.0 external HDD hard drive.

First, plug a new USB drive into a Mac:

  1. The Mac will automatically prompt if you want to use the drive as a Time Machine backup Disk – click “Don’t Use”
  2. Open Disk Utility
  3. On the left side of Disk Utility, under External, you should see your drive listed.
  4. Select the “highest-level” of the drive, not the partitions located underneath. In my case, Seagate Backup+ Desk Media.PC Mac External drive format (1)
  5. At the top of Disk Utility, click the “Erase” button.PC Mac External drive format (2)
  6. Name your disk, such as “JC-External”.
  7. Under “Format” drop-down menu, select “ExFAT”
  8. Under “Scheme” drop-down menu, select “GUID Partition Map”PC Mac External drive format (3)
  9. Click “Erase”
  10. Once the drive has been erased, again, Time Machine will prompt to use as a backup disk – select “Don’t Use”PC Mac External drive format (4)
  11. Click “Done”
  12. Your drive should now be listed under Devices in the Finder.PC Mac External drive format (5)
  13. Control-click or right-click on the device in the Finder, and click “Get Info”.  You can see that indeed it created an 8TB ExFAT Volume, but the Sharing and Permissions cannot be modified. Permissions can only be set if the drive is formatted with  “OS X Extended”. Also, notice that the Created/Modified dates may not be accurate, however, files and folders contained in the drive will display accurate modified dates/times.PC Mac External drive format (6)
  14. One thing to note, is after initially formatting the drive on a Mac, and then attaching the external drive to a Windows 10 PC, the drive may not immediately display with a drive letter by default in the Windows File Explorer. Go into Windows 10 Disk Management and find the drive listed in the discovered drives, but you may find that a drive letter is not associated with the volume.
  15. To fix this, in Disk Management, right-click on the large/unidentified new data volume and click “Change Drive Letter and Paths…”. Next, click the Add.. button, assign a drive letter (D:) and then OK. You should now find your external drive listed in Windows Explorer and see the files and folders you copied into it while it had been connected to your Mac.

 

Hyper-V failed to generate initial replica for server

turbolift_access_denied

I recently found that one of my virtual machines had failed it’s initial replication off to a server located at a different site. I looked at a few of the Hyper-V-VMMS Admin Event Logs and found some of the following errors:

Event ID: 32042 – Hyper-V failed to generate initial replica for ‘040REP001’: General access denied error (0x80070005). (Virtual machine ID GUID)

Event ID: 33680 – Replication operation for virtual machine ‘ServerName’ failed.

Event ID: 32086 – Hyper-V suspended replication for virtual machine ‘ServerName’ due to a non-recoverable failure. Resume replication after correcting the failure.

Also Event ID’s 33676, 18012, 16370

I googled around and found that most resolutions revolved around fixing the “Virtual Machine” group permissions of the parent Folder or Volume by using the icacls command that looks something like this:

icacls “C:ProgramDataMicrosoftWindowsHyper-VVirtual Machines5A6F2E44-7F95-4CF8-89E5-AE8A6648C93A.xml” /grant “NT VIRTUAL MACHINE5A6F2E44-7F95-4CF8-89E5-AE8A6648C93A”:(F) /L

or this:

icacls “C:UsersPublicDocumentsHyper-VVirtual Hard DisksMountPointHere” /grant “NT VIRTUAL MACHINEVirtual Machines”:F /T

The folder that the .vhd was contained in did not have “Virtual Machine” group permissions (c:\hyper-v\exports), so I decided I should move the VM and it’s virtual hard disk to a new location that does have the correct permissions. Since this was an old export, I found the original location of the .vhd in the config file in c:\hyper-v\exports\config.xml.

Since I didn’t like the current location of the virtual machine and .vhd anyway, I decided rather than trying to fix permissions, I’d move it to a better location in a folder that would inherit the correct permissions.

To resolve the replica problem I did the following:

1. Disabled alerting on the server, then shut down the VM.

2. Disabled replication on the vm – right-click on VM in HyperV Manager -> Replication -> Remove Replication

3. Moved all Virtual Machine folders associated with MyServerName out of a folder I had created “c:\Hyper-V\Exports”  including the .vhd within (folders that did not have the permissions) and cut/pasted into “C:\Users\Public\Documents\Hyper-V\Virtual hard disks\” folder that was already created. This folder inherited permissions from the parent folder including the “Virtual Machines” group.

4. On the shut-down VM, I then went into the VM’s settings and then IDE Controller 0 -> Hard Drive -> Changed Location of Virtual Hard Disk by hitting the “Browse…” button, browsed to the new .vhd location folder with the correct permissions -> OK

5. Started the Virtual Machine successfully, then re-enabled replication with the remote site Replica server and, – yes! – initial replica started normally and health is normal again. Sending initial Replica now at 3%.

6. Re-enabled alerting on the server.

Hope this helps someone else who’s replications are failing and they’re struggling with the “General Permissions Error” problems associated with snapshots and replication.